Quarters Worth Money Standard and List of the 20 Most Valuable

Jack16306
61 Min Read

The United States quarter, a coin representing one-fourth of a dollar or 25 cents, has a rich history that dates back to its inception in 1796. With numerous design variations and minting errors, quarters have become a popular choice among numismatists and coin collectors. In this comprehensive article, we delve into the factors that affect the value of quarters, such as rarity, condition, historical significance, and mint errors. We also discuss the standards for valuing quarters, including grading systems and price guides, and present a list of the 20 most valuable quarters. Whether you are a seasoned collector or just starting your journey in numismatics, this article will provide you with valuable insights into the fascinating world of quarters.

Introduction

Definition of Quarters

Quarters are small, circular coins used as a form of currency in the United States. They represent a denomination equal to 25 cents or one-fourth of a dollar. Quarters are minted from various metals, primarily copper and nickel, and have featured different designs over the years.

History of Quarters

The first United States quarter was minted in 1796, and since then, numerous design variations have been introduced. Major design series include Draped Bust (1796-1807), Capped Bust (1815-1838), Liberty Seated (1838-1891), Barber (1892-1916), Standing Liberty (1916-1930), and Washington (1932-present). Additionally, the U.S. Mint has released commemorative and special edition quarters, such as the 50 State Quarters program (1999-2008) and the America the Beautiful Quarters program (2010-2021).

  1. 50 State Quarters Program (1999-2008): This popular program featured unique designs for each of the 50 states, with five designs released each year. The reverse of each quarter highlighted an iconic symbol or landmark of the respective state.
  2. America the Beautiful Quarters Program (2010-2021): This series honored 56 national parks and other national sites, with five new designs issued annually. The reverse of each coin depicted a scene representing the featured location’s natural or historical significance.

Importance of Quarters in Numismatics

Quarters are a popular choice for coin collectors due to their rich history, design variations, and rarity. Collecting quarters can be both an enjoyable hobby and a lucrative investment, with some quarters being worth significantly more than their face value.

Factors That Affect the Value of Quarters

Rarity

  1. Mintage Figures: Mintage figures refer to the number of coins produced by a mint during a specific time. Lower mintage figures generally indicate increased rarity and higher values.
  2. Survival Rates: Survival rates estimate the number of coins that remain in existence today. As coins are lost, destroyed, or worn down, their survival rates decrease, which can increase their rarity and value.

Condition

  1. Grading System: The Sheldon Scale, a 70-point scale, is commonly used to grade the condition of coins. Higher grades indicate better preservation, which often correlates with higher values.
  2. Wear and Tear: Coins can lose detail and value due to circulation and wear. Collectors often seek coins in excellent condition, with minimal wear and tear.
  3. Cleaning and Restoration: Cleaning or restoring a coin can damage its surface, which may negatively impact its value. Professional conservation efforts can sometimes improve a coin’s appearance and value without causing harm.

Historical Significance

  1. Design Variations: Unique or limited designs can make a coin more valuable to collectors.
  2. Key Dates and Mintmarks: Certain years and mintmarks are rarer and more desirable, increasing a coin’s value.

Mint Errors

  1. Types of Errors: Errors can occur during the minting process, resulting in unique features. Examples include doubled dies, off-center strikes, and clipped planchets.
  2. Rarity and Value: Error coins can be quite rare and valuable, especially if the error is dramatic or visually appealing.

Coin Storage and Preservation

Proper coin handling, storage, and preservation are crucial for maintaining the value and condition of coins. Here are some tips for collectors:

  1. Handling: Always hold coins by their edges to prevent fingerprints or oils from damaging their surfaces.
  2. Storage: Use archival-quality holders, such as Mylar flips or acid-free cardboard holders, to protect coins from environmental damage.
  3. Environment: Store coins in a cool, dry place, away from direct sunlight and temperature fluctuations, to minimize the risk of corrosion and toning.

Standards for Valuing Quarters

Grading System

  1. Sheldon Scale: The Sheldon Scale, ranging from 1 (Poor) to 70 (Mint State), is the most widely accepted grading system for U.S. coins.
  2. Details Grading: Details grading accounts for coins with surface issues, such as cleaning, corrosion, or damage. These coins receive a “details” designation, which can affect their value.

Price Guides

  1. Red Book: The Red Book is a popular annual price guide that provides retail values for U.S. coins based on their grade and rarity.
  2. Gray Sheet: The Gray Sheet, also known as the Coin Dealer Newsletter, provides wholesale values for U.S. coins based on recent transactions between dealers.

Auction Sales

  1. Heritage Auctions: Heritage Auctions is a major auction house that deals in rare coins, offering insights into current market values based on auction results.
  2. Stack’s Bowers: Stack’s Bowers is another prominent auction house specializing in rare coins, providing valuable data on realized prices at auctions.

List of the 20 Most Valuable Quarters

Collecting valuable and rare quarters can be a rewarding and lucrative hobby for numismatists. Some notable examples include the 1941-S Washington Quarter, 1950-D Washington Quarter, and 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter. Factors such as rarity, condition, historical significance, and mint errors influence a coin’s value. Utilizing resources like the Sheldon Scale, price guides, and professional grading services can help collectors accurately assess the value of their quarters.

1796 Draped Bust Quarter

The 1796 Draped Bust Quarter is an incredibly significant and rare coin in U.S. numismatics. It marked the first-ever quarter-dollar coin minted by the United States, making it highly desirable among collectors and historians alike.

Design

The obverse of the 1796 Draped Bust Quarter features the Draped Bust design, which was created by Robert Scot, the first Chief Engraver of the United States Mint. This design showcases a right-facing portrait of Lady Liberty with flowing hair and a draped bust. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, while the year “1796” is engraved below. Fifteen stars, representing the fifteen states that made up the United States at the time, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin displays a small, heraldic eagle with a shield on its chest, holding an olive branch and arrows in its talons. Above the eagle, there is a banner displaying the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” which translates to “Out of Many, One.” The denomination “1/4” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1796 Draped Bust Quarter had a limited mintage of only 6,146 coins, making it extremely scarce. Due to its low mintage and historical significance as the first U.S. quarter, this coin is highly sought after by collectors, especially in better grades. Many of the surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, further increasing the rarity and value of high-grade specimens.

Value

The value of the 1796 Draped Bust Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still fetch several thousand dollars, while high-grade examples can command prices well into six figures. In recent years, an exceptionally well-preserved 1796 Draped Bust Quarter graded MS-67 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $1,527,500 at auction, illustrating the extraordinary value that this historic coin can achieve.

1804 Draped Bust Quarter

The 1804 Draped Bust Quarter is another rare and historically significant coin in the world of U.S. numismatics. As one of the early U.S. quarter-dollar coins, it is highly sought after by collectors, particularly those who specialize in early American coinage.

Design

The obverse of the 1804 Draped Bust Quarter features the same design as the 1796 Draped Bust Quarter. Robert Scot’s design presents a right-facing portrait of Lady Liberty with flowing hair and a draped bust. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, while the year “1804” is engraved below. Thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin displays the Heraldic Eagle design, which is an updated version of the small eagle design seen on the 1796 quarter. This design features a larger, more detailed eagle with a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, there is an arc of thirteen stars, symbolizing the original thirteen colonies, and a banner with the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1804 Draped Bust Quarter had a mintage of 6,738 coins. However, due to its age, many of these coins have been lost or damaged over time, making surviving examples scarce. In addition to its low mintage, the 1804 quarter is also known for two different die varieties: the “Normal Date” and the “14-Star Reverse.” The “14-Star Reverse” variety is particularly rare, featuring an extra star accidentally added to the reverse design, making it even more desirable for collectors.

Value

The value of the 1804 Draped Bust Quarter depends on its condition, rarity, and die variety. Coins with significant wear or damage can still command prices in the thousands of dollars, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. The “14-Star Reverse” variety tends to be more valuable due to its rarity. In recent years, an 1804 Draped Bust Quarter graded MS-65 by NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation) sold for $470,000 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this historic coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter

The 1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter is a fascinating and rare coin in U.S. numismatics due to its overdate error. This overdate occurs when a numeral from a previous year’s die is still visible underneath the current year’s numeral. In this case, the underlying “2” from 1822 can be seen beneath the “3” in the date. Collectors highly value the 1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter, as it represents an intriguing piece of numismatic history.

Design

The obverse of the 1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter features the Capped Bust design by John Reich, who was an engraver at the United States Mint. This design presents a left-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap, with her hair flowing back. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1823” (with the underlying “2”) is engraved below. The portrait is surrounded by thirteen stars, symbolizing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin features an updated version of the Heraldic Eagle design. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, there is an arc of stars, and a banner bearing the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter had a mintage of only 17,800 coins, making it quite scarce. The overdate error adds to its rarity, as collectors seek out these unusual and historically significant coins. Many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage, making high-grade specimens even more challenging to find and highly sought after by collectors.

Value

See also  Top 15 Most Valuable One Dollar Coins (A Comprehensive Guide to US Coin Collecting and Investment Opportunitie)

The value of the 1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the hundreds or thousands of dollars, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1823/2 Capped Bust Quarter graded MS-65 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $246,750 at auction, showcasing the remarkable value that this rare overdate coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

1827 Capped Bust Quarter

The 1827 Capped Bust Quarter is a valuable and sought-after coin in U.S. numismatics due to its low mintage and historical significance. Collectors who specialize in early American coinage are particularly interested in acquiring this coin as part of their collections.

Design

The obverse of the 1827 Capped Bust Quarter features John Reich’s Capped Bust design, which presents a left-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap with her hair flowing back. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1827” is engraved below. Thirteen stars surround the portrait, symbolizing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin showcases the Heraldic Eagle design. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, there is an arc of stars and a banner displaying the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1827 Capped Bust Quarter had a low mintage of only 4,000 coins, making it a rare and desirable coin among collectors. Due to its age, many of the surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, further increasing the rarity and value of high-grade specimens.

There are also two major die varieties for the 1827 Capped Bust Quarter: the “Square Base 2” and the “Curled Base 2.” The “Square Base 2” variety is more common, while the “Curled Base 2” is rarer and more valuable.

Value

The value of the 1827 Capped Bust Quarter depends on its condition, rarity, and die variety. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still fetch prices in the thousands of dollars, while high-grade examples can command much higher sums. The rarer “Curled Base 2” variety tends to be more valuable due to its scarcity. In recent years, an 1827 Capped Bust Quarter of the “Curled Base 2” variety, graded MS-66 by NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation), sold for $96,938 at auction, illustrating the considerable value that this rare coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

1831 Capped Bust Quarter

The 1831 Capped Bust Quarter is a popular and collectible coin in U.S. numismatics. While not as rare as some other early American quarters, its historical significance and beautiful design make it an appealing addition to many collections.

Design

The obverse of the 1831 Capped Bust Quarter features the Capped Bust design by John Reich. It presents a left-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap with her hair flowing back. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1831” is engraved below. Thirteen stars surround the portrait, representing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin showcases the Heraldic Eagle design. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, there is an arc of stars and a banner displaying the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1831 Capped Bust Quarter had a mintage of 398,000 coins, which is relatively higher than other early American quarters. While not considered exceptionally rare, the age of the coin means that many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage, making high-grade specimens more scarce and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1831 Capped Bust Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $20 to $100, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1831 Capped Bust Quarter graded MS-67 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $32,900 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is worth noting that the value of an 1831 Capped Bust Quarter can vary significantly depending on its specific grade, and it is crucial for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine the coin’s accurate value.

1834 Capped Bust Quarter

The 1834 Capped Bust Quarter is a notable coin in U.S. numismatics, with its historical significance and attractive design appealing to many collectors. While it is not considered exceptionally rare, high-grade examples can still command significant value.

Design

The obverse of the 1834 Capped Bust Quarter features John Reich’s Capped Bust design. It presents a left-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap, with her hair flowing back. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1834” is engraved below. Thirteen stars surround the portrait, representing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin showcases the Heraldic Eagle design. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, there is an arc of stars and a banner displaying the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1834 Capped Bust Quarter had a mintage of 286,000 coins. While this mintage is not considered low in comparison to other early American quarters, many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage due to their age. This makes high-grade specimens more scarce and valuable to collectors.

Value

The value of the 1834 Capped Bust Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $20 to $100, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1834 Capped Bust Quarter graded MS-66+ by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $19,200 at auction, demonstrating the considerable value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1834 Capped Bust Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1838-O Capped Bust Quarter

The 1838-O Capped Bust Quarter is a highly sought-after and valuable coin in U.S. numismatics. This particular quarter is famous for being the first quarter dollar struck at the New Orleans Mint, adding historical significance to its appeal for collectors.

Design

The obverse of the 1838-O Capped Bust Quarter features John Reich’s Capped Bust design. It presents a left-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap, with her hair flowing back. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1838” is engraved below. Thirteen stars surround the portrait, representing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin showcases the Heraldic Eagle design. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, there is an arc of stars and a banner displaying the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design. The “O” mintmark representing the New Orleans Mint can be found below the eagle.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1838-O Capped Bust Quarter had a mintage of only 20 proofs and 364,000 business strikes. Due to its age, many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage, making high-grade specimens particularly scarce and valuable. The proof examples are extremely rare, with only a few known to exist in private collections.

Value

The value of the 1838-O Capped Bust Quarter depends on its condition, rarity, and strike type. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $50 to $200, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1838-O Capped Bust Quarter graded MS-65 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $84,000 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

The proof examples of the 1838-O Capped Bust Quarter are extraordinarily rare and valuable. One of these coins, graded PR-64 by PCGS, sold for $763,750 at auction, showcasing the incredible value and collector interest in this first-year issue from the New Orleans Mint.

1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter

The 1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter is a valuable and historically significant coin in U.S. numismatics. With its low mintage and association with the early years of the San Francisco Mint, this particular quarter attracts much attention from collectors.

Design

The obverse of the 1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter features the Seated Liberty design by Christian Gobrecht. It presents Lady Liberty seated on a rock, holding a shield with the inscription “LIBERTY” in her right hand and a staff with a liberty cap in her left hand. The date “1866” is engraved below the design, and thirteen stars surround the portrait, representing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, a banner displays the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “QUAR. DOL.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found below the eagle.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter had a low mintage of only 28,000 coins. Due to its age and the challenging conditions of early San Francisco Mint operations, many surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, making high-grade specimens particularly scarce and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $100 to $500, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter graded MS-66 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $54,625 at auction, demonstrating the considerable value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1866-S Seated Liberty Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter

The 1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter is a highly prized and historically significant coin in U.S. numismatics. It has gained its reputation due to its low mintage, being the first quarter struck at the Carson City Mint, and its association with the early years of the Comstock Lode silver discovery.

Design

The obverse of the 1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter features the Seated Liberty design by Christian Gobrecht. It presents Lady Liberty seated on a rock, holding a shield with the inscription “LIBERTY” in her right hand and a staff with a liberty cap in her left hand. The date “1870” is engraved below the design, and thirteen stars surround the portrait, representing the original thirteen colonies.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, a banner displays the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “QUAR. DOL.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design. The “CC” mintmark representing the Carson City Mint can be found below the eagle.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter had an extremely low mintage of just 8,340 coins. Due to its age, challenging minting conditions, and the historical context of the Carson City Mint, many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage. This makes high-grade specimens exceedingly rare and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $1,000 to $5,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter graded MS-64 by NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation) sold for $264,500 at auction, demonstrating the tremendous value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

See also  Uncovering the Value of Bat Quarters: A Comprehensive Guide to Collecting, Grading, and Investing in America the Beautiful Quarters

It is crucial for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1870-CC Liberty Seated Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1896-S Barber Quarter

The 1896-S Barber Quarter is a key date and highly desirable coin in the Barber Quarter series. Its low mintage, coupled with the historic significance of the San Francisco Mint, makes it an attractive target for collectors and investors alike.

Design

The obverse of the 1896-S Barber Quarter features the iconic design by Charles E. Barber. It presents a right-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap adorned with a laurel wreath. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1896” is engraved below. Thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin showcases an adaptation of the Great Seal of the United States by Barber. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, a banner displays the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found below the eagle.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1896-S Barber Quarter had a low mintage of only 188,039 coins. Many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage due to their age, making high-grade specimens particularly scarce and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1896-S Barber Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $250 to $1,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, an 1896-S Barber Quarter graded MS-67 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $130,000 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1896-S Barber Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1901-S Barber Quarter

The 1901-S Barber Quarter is one of the most sought-after and valuable coins in the Barber Quarter series. Its extremely low mintage and the historical significance of the San Francisco Mint make it a prime target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1901-S Barber Quarter features the iconic design by Charles E. Barber. It presents a right-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap adorned with a laurel wreath. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1901” is engraved below. Thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin showcases an adaptation of the Great Seal of the United States by Barber. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, a banner displays the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found below the eagle.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1901-S Barber Quarter had an extremely low mintage of only 72,664 coins, making it one of the rarest and most valuable Barber Quarters. Many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage due to their age, further contributing to the scarcity of high-grade specimens.

Value

The value of the 1901-S Barber Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $2,000 to $5,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1901-S Barber Quarter graded MS-68 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $327,750 at auction, demonstrating the extraordinary value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1901-S Barber Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1913-S Barber Quarter

The 1913-S Barber Quarter is a key date and highly desirable coin within the Barber Quarter series. With its low mintage and association with the historic San Francisco Mint, it is a prime target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1913-S Barber Quarter features the iconic design by Charles E. Barber. It presents a right-facing portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a Phrygian cap adorned with a laurel wreath. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed on a band across the cap, and the date “1913” is engraved below. Thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin showcases an adaptation of the Great Seal of the United States by Barber. The eagle has a shield on its chest, an olive branch in its right talon, and arrows in its left talon. Above the eagle, a banner displays the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The denomination “25 C.” is inscribed below the eagle, and the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” encircle the design. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found below the eagle.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1913-S Barber Quarter had a low mintage of only 40,000 coins, making it one of the scarcest and most valuable issues in the series. Due to its age and the challenging minting conditions at the San Francisco Mint, many surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, making high-grade specimens exceedingly rare and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1913-S Barber Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $500 to $2,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1913-S Barber Quarter graded MS-66 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $50,400 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1913-S Barber Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1916 Standing Liberty Quarter

The 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter is a highly sought-after and valuable coin within the Standing Liberty Quarter series. Its low mintage, historical significance, and the introduction of a new design make it an attractive target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter features the iconic design by Hermon A. MacNeil. It presents a full-length, front-facing portrait of Lady Liberty standing between two gates, holding a shield with her left hand and an olive branch in her right hand. The date “1916” is engraved below the design, and thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle in flight, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter had an extremely low mintage of only 52,000 coins, making it the rarest and most valuable issue in the series. Due to its age and popularity, many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage, which further contributes to the scarcity of high-grade specimens.

Value

The value of the 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $2,000 to $5,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter graded MS-67 FH (Full Head) by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $152,750 at auction, demonstrating the extraordinary value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter

The 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter is a highly sought-after and valuable overdate error coin within the Standing Liberty Quarter series. Its rarity, historical significance, and association with the San Francisco Mint make it a prime target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter features the iconic design by Hermon A. MacNeil. It presents a full-length, front-facing portrait of Lady Liberty standing between two gates, holding a shield with her left hand and an olive branch in her right hand. The date “1918/7” is engraved below the design, with the “7” clearly visible underneath the “8.” Thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle in flight, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found to the left of the eagle’s tail.

Mintage and Rarity

The exact mintage figures for the 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter are unknown due to its overdate error status, but it is widely recognized as one of the rarest and most valuable coins in the series. Many surviving examples have experienced wear or damage due to their age, which further contributes to the scarcity of high-grade specimens.

Value

The value of the 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $2,500 to $10,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter graded MS-65 FH (Full Head) by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $336,000 at auction, demonstrating the extraordinary value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1918/7-S Standing Liberty Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter

The 1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter is a key date and highly desirable coin within the Standing Liberty Quarter series. Its low mintage and association with the historic San Francisco Mint make it a prime target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter features the iconic design by Hermon A. MacNeil. It presents a full-length, front-facing portrait of Lady Liberty standing between two gates, holding a shield with her left hand and an olive branch in her right hand. The date “1927” is engraved below the design, and thirteen stars, representing the original thirteen colonies, surround the portrait.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle in flight, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found to the left of the eagle’s tail.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter had a low mintage of only 396,000 coins, making it one of the scarcest and most valuable issues in the series. Due to its age and the challenging minting conditions at the San Francisco Mint, many surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, making high-grade specimens exceedingly rare and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $300 to $1,000, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter graded MS-67 FH (Full Head) by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $176,250 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

See also  Top 20 Most Valuable Dimes Worth Money “A Comprehensive Guide to Collecting and Investing in Rare and Historic Coins”

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1932-D Washington Quarter

The 1932-D Washington Quarter is a key date and highly sought-after coin within the Washington Quarter series. Its low mintage and association with the historic Denver Mint make it a prime target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1932-D Washington Quarter features the iconic design by John Flanagan. It presents a left-facing portrait of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, with the date “1932” engraved below.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with outstretched wings, standing on a bundle of arrows and an olive branch. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The “D” mintmark representing the Denver Mint can be found to the right of the olive branch.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1932-D Washington Quarter had a low mintage of only 436,800 coins, making it one of the scarcest and most valuable issues in the series. Due to its age and the challenging minting conditions at the Denver Mint, many surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, making high-grade specimens exceedingly rare and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1932-D Washington Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $100 to $500, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1932-D Washington Quarter graded MS-67 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $49,937 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1932-D Washington Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1932-S Washington Quarter

The 1932-S Washington Quarter is a key date and highly sought-after coin within the Washington Quarter series. Its low mintage and association with the historic San Francisco Mint make it a prime target for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1932-S Washington Quarter features the iconic design by John Flanagan. It presents a left-facing portrait of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, with the date “1932” engraved below.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with outstretched wings, standing on a bundle of arrows and an olive branch. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found to the right of the olive branch.

Mintage and Rarity

The 1932-S Washington Quarter had a low mintage of only 408,000 coins, making it one of the scarcest and most valuable issues in the series. Due to its age and the challenging minting conditions at the San Francisco Mint, many surviving examples have experienced significant wear or damage, making high-grade specimens exceedingly rare and valuable.

Value

The value of the 1932-S Washington Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $100 to $400, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1932-S Washington Quarter graded MS-67 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $32,900 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1932-S Washington Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade.

1941-S Washington Quarter

The 1941-S Washington Quarter is a notable issue within the Washington Quarter series. Its connection to the historic San Francisco Mint and the World War II era make it an interesting coin for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1941-S Washington Quarter features the iconic design by John Flanagan. It presents a left-facing portrait of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, with the date “1941” engraved below.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with outstretched wings, standing on a bundle of arrows and an olive branch. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The “S” mintmark representing the San Francisco Mint can be found to the right of the olive branch.

Mintage

The 1941-S Washington Quarter had a mintage of 16,080,000 coins. Although it is not considered one of the rarest issues within the series, it still holds value for collectors, especially in higher grades.

Value

The value of the 1941-S Washington Quarter depends on its condition. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can be found for under $10, while high-grade examples can fetch higher sums. In recent years, a 1941-S Washington Quarter graded MS-67+ by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $6,169 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1941-S Washington Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade. Collectors may also find interest in the 1941-S Washington Quarter due to its historical context during World War II, making it an appealing addition to a collection.

1950-D Washington Quarter

The 1950-D Washington Quarter is a notable issue within the Washington Quarter series. Its connection to the historic Denver Mint and the post-World War II era make it an interesting coin for collectors and investors.

Design

The obverse of the 1950-D Washington Quarter features the iconic design by John Flanagan. It presents a left-facing portrait of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, with the date “1950” engraved below.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with outstretched wings, standing on a bundle of arrows and an olive branch. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below. The “D” mintmark representing the Denver Mint can be found to the right of the olive branch.

Mintage

The 1950-D Washington Quarter had a mintage of 21,075,000 coins. Although it is not considered one of the rarest issues within the series, it still holds value for collectors, especially in higher grades.

Value

The value of the 1950-D Washington Quarter depends on its condition. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can be found for under $10, while high-grade examples can fetch higher sums. In recent years, a 1950-D Washington Quarter graded MS-67+ by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $3,290 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1950-D Washington Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade. Collectors may also find interest in the 1950-D Washington Quarter due to its historical context during the post-World War II era, making it an appealing addition to a collection.

1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter

The 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter is an interesting and valuable variety within the Washington Quarter series. Its unique doubled die obverse error makes it a popular target for error coin collectors and investors alike.

Design

The obverse of the 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter features the iconic design by John Flanagan. It presents a left-facing portrait of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The word “LIBERTY” is inscribed above the portrait, with the date “1955” engraved below. On the doubled die obverse variety, there is noticeable doubling on the date, the word “LIBERTY,” and the “IN GOD WE TRUST” motto, making it a unique and intriguing error.

The reverse of the coin showcases an eagle with outstretched wings, standing on a bundle of arrows and an olive branch. The words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” encircle the design, with the denomination “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscribed below.

Mintage and Rarity

The exact number of 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarters is unknown, but the variety is considered relatively scarce compared to regular 1955 Washington Quarters. The doubled die obverse error is believed to have resulted from a misalignment of the die during the minting process, creating a doubled impression on the coin.

Value

The value of the 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter depends on its condition and rarity. Lower-grade coins with significant wear can still command prices in the range of $300 to $500, while high-grade examples can fetch much higher sums. In recent years, a 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter graded MS-64 by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service) sold for $9,600 at auction, demonstrating the impressive value that this error coin can achieve in exceptional condition.

It is essential for collectors to consult reputable price guides or professional grading services to determine an accurate value for a specific 1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington Quarter, as the value can vary significantly depending on its grade and the severity of the doubling. This variety is highly sought after by error coin collectors and can be a valuable addition to any collection.

The table below summarizes the key information for each of the three notable quarters discussed in this article.

CoinMintmarkMintageValue Range (approx.)
1941-S Washington QuarterS16,080,000$10 (lower-grade) to $6,169 (high-grade, MS-67+)
1950-D Washington QuarterD21,075,000$10 (lower-grade) to $3,290 (high-grade, MS-67+)
1955 Doubled Die Obverse Washington QuarterN/AUnknown$300 – $500 (lower-grade) to $9,600 (high-grade, MS-64)

Conclusion

Summary of Key Points

  • The value of quarters is influenced by factors such as rarity, condition, historical significance, and mint errors.
  • The Sheldon Scale and price guides, such as the Red Book and Gray Sheet, are important resources for determining coin values.
  • Some quarters, like the ones listed in this article, are highly valuable and sought after by collectors due to their rarity, condition, and historical significance.

Recommendations for Collectors

  • Familiarize yourself with grading systems and price guides to accurately assess the value of your quarters.
  • Consider purchasing high-quality coins, as they tend to retain and increase in value over time.
  • Always handle and store your coins properly to prevent damage and maintain their value.

Future Outlook of the Quarter Market

The quarter market will likely continue to evolve as new designs are introduced, and older, rarer coins become even more scarce. As long as there is an interest in numismatics and coin collecting, there will be a market for valuable and rare quarters. Collectors should stay informed about trends and developments in the coin market to make the most of their investments.

Resources for Coin Collectors

Expand your numismatic knowledge and connect with fellow collectors by exploring the following reputable resources:

Websites: Coin-focused websites offer valuable information, news, and updates on coin releases and market trends. Some reputable sites include:

Forums: Online forums provide platforms for collectors to share knowledge, ask questions, and discuss topics related to coin collecting. Notable forums are:

Books: Reference books are essential resources for collectors. Some well-regarded titles include:

  • “A Guide Book of United States Coins” (also known as the Red Book) by R.S. Yeoman (6)
  • “The Official ANA Grading Standards for United States Coins” by the American Numismatic Association (7)

Organizations: Joining organizations can provide networking opportunities, access to resources, and support for collectors at all experience levels. Consider the following organizations:

  • American Numismatic Association (ANA) (8): www.money.org
  • Local coin clubs (check for listings in your area)

Share this Article
Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *